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Bioeconomy

A tree that grows binds carbon dioxide from the air in the wood while the tree produces oxygen that we can breathe. When the tree is cut off, all parts of the tree can be taken and processed and the carbon dioxide remains in the wood throughout the entire woodstock’s life cycle.

A tree that grows binds carbon dioxide from the air in the tree wood while the tree produces oxygen that we can breathe. When the tree is cut off, all parts of the tree can be taken and processed and the carbon dioxide remains in the wood throughout the entire woodstock’s life cycle. The carbon dioxide overload in society is further reduced by forest-based products replacing oil and other commodities with higher climate loads. So choosing wood-based products instead of, for example, plastic products reduces the use of oil and thus reduces carbon dioxide emissions to the air. At the end of the cycle of the forest raw material, used forest products become bioenergy.

Illustration, ett biobaserat samhälle

Today, almost half of all consumed forest raw materials in the world go straight to fires. In Sweden, it looks a bit different. In order to utilize forest resources efficiently regarding positive climate impact, the user chains should be as long as possible. In other words, instead of using forest raw materials directly for fires the raw material must be refined, reused and eventually become biofuel. Today, all products that can be made of oil can instead be made from forest raw materials, read more about this under New Forest Products.

For every tree that is cut down, at least two new trees are planted in the Swedish forest. And we have large forest areas in Sweden, almost 73% of Sweden is covered by forests, and about 80% of this area is used for forestry. The annual harvesting in Sweden corresponds to only 1% of the forest so the forest actually grows more than we harvest in a year. In fact, it takes only 1 minute for the Swedish forest to produce the material needed to build an eight-storey house completely in wood!

According to the Research Council, Formas, bioeconomy means “Sustainable production of biomass to enable increased use in a number of social sectors. The aim is to reduce climate impact and the use of fossil raw materials. Increased value added of biomass while minimizing energy consumption and nutrition and energy taken advantage of the end products. The aim is to optimize the value and contribution of ecosystem services to the economy. “

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